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Raymond McCabe
Raymond J. McCabe, P.E.
It's March and with it brings an end of the winter season, March Madness, St. Patrick's Day and a look toward the warmer weather. In this issue I would like to address a major issue facing our society and that is the future shortage of civil engineers. As our population continues to grow and our fragile infrastructure continues to age, the next decade will see a significant increase in construction spending and there will not be enough civil engineers to meet the need. The New York Metropolitan Area will certainly see a significant number of necessary infrastructure projects. Why the shortage? Over the past decade, college students have been lured by higher paying jobs in other fields. Pay levels for civil engineers are lower compared to other engineering professions. What needs to be done? First, we all need to get involved with the high school community and demonstrate how truly exciting and rewarding our civil engineering profession is. Second, our civil engineering institutions need to examine their programs with the goal of graduating more rounded engineers faster. In addition to the most important technical skills, engineers entering the workforce must also have improved leadership, organizational and management skills. Finally, we must continue to improve our image in society and the significant contributions we make in order for civil engineers' salary to be at an equal level with the other engineering professions.

Raymond J. McCabe, P.E.
President, ASCE Met Section